Why Occupy NY won’t work

Why Occupy Wall Street Won’t work

They say they speak for the 99%. And yet 99% of Americans don’t support them. Why is that? Everyone has their personal reasons why they can or can’t identify with these people. But what are the underlying issues for the majority of people. I think there are several reasons.

1. Lack of a coherent issue. Explain why you’re pissed. Ask 20 protesters and get 20 answers. 1/2 The signs of the protestors are pissed at wall street, but who on wall street are they pissed at? Oh, and the other 1/2 want world peace, want to cure world hunger, and some of the protestors want to legalize marijuana. WTF people, pick 1 mission and stick to it. Get your agenda straight.
2. Lack of a coherent solution. No one has a clear idea how to fix it. Many people know the tax system is broken, but no one has come up with a viable alternative.
3. Lack of a Standard Bearer. Call it LEADERSHIP. Every yahoo is out there doing their own thing. It’s like a carnival and every nutjob is coming out of the woodwork to raise their own issue. The civil rights movement had Martin Luther King. LEARN FROM HISTORY WHAT WORKS.
4. They can’t stop themselves from escalating to violence. How many people who attend a tea party rally have been arrested? You may not like the tea party, but they follow the law. Let’s face it, NOBODY likes a punk.
5. We’re not buying what you’re selling. Here’s the MAIN reason why it won’t work, and here’s your byline people. Every man woman and child in America has grown up with just one belief/thought/dream/hope/prayer in common. That somehow, someday, through a miracle, the right combination of numbers on a lottery ticket or old fashion hard work, we all want to strike it rich. And this reason extends to the whole world. Everyone wants to be rich, and THAT’S the 99% that you haven’t sold your idea to.

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmail

Planning a photo shoot

Planning a photo shoot.

When you plan a photo shoot, you need to script it out ahead of time. The big difference between a good shoot and a great shoot is a shoot that has every detail possible worked out in advance.

Here’s how a great photo shoot develops.
1. Concept. Someone sits down and writes out a concept. It needs to be like a business plan and should include all aspects of the photo shoot. It should include a basic timeline of the shoot day and what will happen at key times.
2. Research. The internet has millions of photographs from people who may have had a similar idea. Collect several examples of concept so you can share with models, MUA’s, Stylists and the rest of your team.
3. Action plan. Should be on paper – how are you going to execute the concept. List the types of subject, decide who you want on your team, list any extra items you need to procure. Start to consider lighting. Pick a location.
4. Scout. Go out to your location and take photographs. Look for any impediments to your shoot – local regulations or permits. Areas of safety concerns. For studio shoots, consider layout, backgrounds and equipment needs.
5. Recruit. Make your team. Locate makeup artists, hairstylists, wardrobe people (if possible) model & photographers, and an art director & any assistants you’ll need.
6. Hold a meeting. It can be 1 or more teleconferences or in person. Meet with the creative team and discuss the concept. Go over everyone’s role in the process and explain what you need. Share location and concept photos with all members of your team and discuss special needs
7. Reconfirm. A couple days in advance of your shoot, touch bases with ever one involved and confirm every one is still on board and on track. Check for any last minute snafu
8. Work the photo shoot. Everyone should be on board with the overall plan. You should be prepared to again cover photos of the concept and fine tune the concept as you go. Pull out your timeline and make sure people stay as close as possible to the plan as possible.
9. After action wrap up. Sit down and make notes about what went right and what went wrong. Add the items you missed to your todo list for the next photo shoot and learn from your mistakes. A note here. If other people on the team made mistakes, list them for yourself so YOU can learn better and next time be proactive in your planning.

Followup. Let people know they did a great job. This isn’t the time to list mistakes they made. It’s time to thank them for their hard work and ask them to let you know if they’d work with you again.

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmail